Author Daniel H. Pink described the company's business model as "expressly built for purpose maximization," whereby Toms is selling both shoes and its ideal. Toms' consumer market are purchasing shoes and also making a purchase that transforms them into benefactors for the company.[37] Another phrase used to try to describe the business model has been "caring capitalism".[38] Part of how Toms has developed this description is by incorporating the giving into its business model before it made a profit, making it as integral to the business model as its revenue generating aspects.[39] Business tycoon and Virgin Group founder Richard Branson wrote of the company's business model in his book Screw Business as Usual, "They look for communities that will benefit most from Toms based on their economic, health and education needs while taking into account local business so as not to create a correlating negative effect." He also commented on Toms' expansion into eyewear in order to help the nearly 300 million people who are visually impaired in developing nations.[40] 

Browse the TOMS Men's Shop for an assortment of TOMS men's shoes, eyewear, bags and more. We'll keep you sophisticated and comfortable whether you're looking for Classics, slip-on shoes, boots, sneakers, lace-ups or flip-flops. Our men's sunglasses come in a selection of frames and lens styles, including polarized eyewear which keep your eyes safe from harmful UV rays while adding a bold element to any outfit. With every product you purchase, TOMS will help a person in need. One for One®.
What began as a simple idea has evolved into a powerful business model. Realizing that One for One could serve other basic needs, TOMS launched other products including TOMS eyewear in 2011, TOMS Roasting Co. in 2014, and TOMS Bags and TOMS StandUp Backpack Collection in 2015. With every TOMS product you purchase, TOMS will help a person in need. One for One®.
The Tom's 'One for One' model has inspired many different companies to adopt similar concepts. Warby Parker, launched in 2010, donates a pair of glasses to someone in need for every pair of glasses it sells. The social business Ruby Cup uses a 'Buy One Give One' model for their menstrual cup venture, benefiting women in Kenya.[61] A Bristol chiropractic center influenced by Mycoskie's Start Something That Matters[62] book started donating £1 to Cherish Uganda for every appointment attended.[63] 

A story by LA Weekly priced the manufacturing cost of a pair of Toms Shoes at $3.50-$5.00 in U.S. dollars, and noted that the children's shoes given out by the company were among the cheapest to make, which is not necessarily apparent to consumers. According to garment-industry author Kelsey Timmerman, many people he spoke to in Ethiopia were critical of the company, saying that they felt it exploited the idea of Ethiopian poverty as a marketing tool. An Argentina-based shoemaker agreed, saying that the imagery used by the company was manipulative.[47]
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