A rear-facing car seat offers the best protection for babies and toddlers and should be properly used for as long as possible, to the limits of the car seat. It is no longer recommended to turn your baby around immediately at one year and 20 pounds. A 2007 study in the Journal of Injury Prevention showed that rear-facing toddlers under age 2 are 75 percent less likely to die or be seriously injured in a crash. According to NHTSA, a rear-facing car seat is 71 percent safer than no restraint at all, and a forward-facing car seat is 54 percent safer than no restraint at all. Keeping your baby rear-facing to the limit of the seat is the safest choice. You can check your car seat instruction book or the labels on the car seat sides to find the rear-facing weight and height limits.
One of the biggest advantages is the anti-rebound bar that offers more support and safety for your child. The lowest harness settings fit smaller babies, but the model also fits babies that tend to be longer and taller (up to 35 pounds) so you can keep them in a rear-facing seat longer. The different settings for height and width make this a perfect fit for almost everyone.
Infant seats typically have a base that stays in the vehicle although most (but not all) models can also be installed without the base. This type of carseat is rear-facing only for infants up 30-something lbs. and is highly portable. For infant seats rated higher than 30 lbs., almost all babies will outgrow the seat by height before reaching the weight limit. You can purchase extra bases to use in other vehicles if that suits your needs.

Our child development expert, Jonas, has this to stay on the subject: “Consider the recall history of a brand before making a purchase. If they’ve recently pulled products from store shelves, what was the reason? Products may be recalled for regulation changes, missing or incomplete labels, manufacturing defects, or reported injuries. Not all recalls are the fault of the manufacturer, so it’s important to understand the reason behind the incident. Recalls may be voluntarily initiated by the manufacturer or mandatorily by the NHTSA — the government branch that’s responsible for vehicle safety.”
What you want to look for is if the lap belt lies flat on top of the thighs and NOT the abdomen. The shoulder belt should fit snugly across the middle of the child’s shoulder, NOT down on the arm or against the neck. If you can’t get the vehicle belt to fit properly using the booster guides, then a harnessed booster would be safer until the child is bigger.
Many police and fire departments now have officers/firefighters who are certified child passenger technicians. You can contact your local police force to ask. Otherwise, you can search for local car seat inspection centers and professional installers near you. The technicians will be able to verify if your car seat is safely installed and help you do it the right way.

Some models tout additional protective features; one of the more commonly advertised options is enhanced side impact protection. Keep in mind crash test data is not available, so you can’t see for yourself if an added feature really does make the seat safer in a crash. If you’re on a budget, you don’t need to go with an expensive top-end model to be confident your child is safe – the fitment of the seat and where it’s positioned in your car is far more important. On the other hand, if you can afford the fully-featured model and you trust claims made by the manufacturer, added safety features may offer more protection in certain types of crashes. Use your own judgment.
Hi Margaret, thanks for your question. We haven’t had the pleasure of reviewing this booster seat yet, but we did a little research, and it seems like a good option. However, it is a narrow profile seat, which is great for fitting into a backseat with other car seats, but may still feel narrow for your child, since the armrests aren’t removable. If you get a chance to try one in a retail store, that might help you determine the fit better.
Our child development expert, Jonas, has this to stay on the subject: “Consider the recall history of a brand before making a purchase. If they’ve recently pulled products from store shelves, what was the reason? Products may be recalled for regulation changes, missing or incomplete labels, manufacturing defects, or reported injuries. Not all recalls are the fault of the manufacturer, so it’s important to understand the reason behind the incident. Recalls may be voluntarily initiated by the manufacturer or mandatorily by the NHTSA — the government branch that’s responsible for vehicle safety.”
Why would you want to keep your child rear-facing? Crash data shows us that anybody is safer in a crash when riding rear-facing for the reasons outlined above. Even though your baby's neck may now be strong enough to withstand some types of forward-facing crash forces, he or she is still better protected in a rear-facing car seat because that seat still distributes the force over a greater body area and still gives better support to their young head and neck.
The AAP recommends not using car seats for sleeping in general. Sure, it’s fine to let baby sleep in the car or while you’re shopping. But for regular naps and bedtime, a crib is the safest place for your baby. Baby’s airway can be more restricted in a car seat. They can also overheat, and their heads could develop flat spots if left lying too long.
It’s no surprise that children grow fast! When your child has outgrown the height and/or weight limits for their harnessed car seat, it’s time to shop for the best booster car seat you can find. Booster seats are designed to help prepare your child for using the vehicle seat belt alone. They properly align the vehicle belt across your child’s lap and shoulder.
Our child development expert, Jonas, has this to stay on the subject: “Consider the recall history of a brand before making a purchase. If they’ve recently pulled products from store shelves, what was the reason? Products may be recalled for regulation changes, missing or incomplete labels, manufacturing defects, or reported injuries. Not all recalls are the fault of the manufacturer, so it’s important to understand the reason behind the incident. Recalls may be voluntarily initiated by the manufacturer or mandatorily by the NHTSA — the government branch that’s responsible for vehicle safety.”

Black fabric will hide stains better, but there are a wide variety of colors and patterns depending on the brand of car seat. Even the budget-friendly seats have a nice selection. The premium-priced seats usually have the best quality fabric and padding. They’re less likely to tear, pill and fade. We’ve found that breathability doesn’t depend much on price, however.
Children who have outgrown their rear-facing seat and weigh at least 10 kg (22 lb) may ride facing the front in a child car seat. These child car seats have a built-in harness designed to keep your child safe throughout the journey, during sudden stops or a crash. Use a forward-facing seat until your child reaches the maximum weight or height limits for the child car seat. Some forward-facing seats are made for children who weigh up to 30 kg (65 lb).
Black fabric will hide stains better, but there are a wide variety of colors and patterns depending on the brand of car seat. Even the budget-friendly seats have a nice selection. The premium-priced seats usually have the best quality fabric and padding. They’re less likely to tear, pill and fade. We’ve found that breathability doesn’t depend much on price, however.
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Children grow quickly, you blink and your newborn is a toddler! Invest in a convertible car seat that grows with your child. Models are 3 in 1 that provide you with a cost effective solution to your child’s safety in the car. Protect your seat with a cover with storage for toys and books. Never be worried about your child’s comfort and enjoyment as they grow. 
Very young children are especially at risk for head and spinal cord injuries because their bones and ligaments are still developing. Their heads are also proportionately larger than their necks, so the structural support system is still a little wobbly. Rear-facing seats give the best support to your child's head, neck, and spine, and prevent your child's head from being thrown away from his body in the event of a car crash.
Specifically designed for newborns and younger babies, infant car seats may only be used in the rear-facing position. Experts unanimously agree that this is the safest position, and most recommend starting out with an infant car seat. At the time of this writing, all Britax infant car seats feature the Click & Go system for effortless connection to any Britax stroller.
Features: Rear-facing 9-40 lbs. (Pria 70), 14-40 lbs. (Pria 85); Forward-facing 22-70 lbs. (Pria 70), 22-85 lbs. (Pria 85). Both seats have no re-thread harness; deep head wings with Air Protect technology for enhanced side-impact protection; push-on LATCH connectors; 3 position base; integrated cup holder, easy remove covers that are machine washable and dryer safe.
Not all Britax booster car seats have the ClickTight system, but owners generally agree that these seats are easy to install. Again, you’ll find Britax offers various pricing tiers in the booster car seat category. Check the specs before buying, including the targeted age and weight range of the seat, to make sure your chosen product has the features you want.
Our child development expert, Jonas, has this to stay on the subject: “Consider the recall history of a brand before making a purchase. If they’ve recently pulled products from store shelves, what was the reason? Products may be recalled for regulation changes, missing or incomplete labels, manufacturing defects, or reported injuries. Not all recalls are the fault of the manufacturer, so it’s important to understand the reason behind the incident. Recalls may be voluntarily initiated by the manufacturer or mandatorily by the NHTSA — the government branch that’s responsible for vehicle safety.” 

Our comments: Excellent overall if you are planning to use an infant seat from birth and then transition to a convertible when your baby is bigger/older. The 50 lbs. rear-facing weight limit gives parents the option to keep their kids rear-facing longer but the top harness slots aren’t especially tall (16″) so it will be outgrown by height in the forward-facing position long before the 65 lbs. weight limit is reached. Rava is one of the most expensive convertibles on the market but the quality and features are all top-notch and the styling and fashions are luxurious. LATCH weight limits are 35. lbs in the rear-facing position and 40 lbs. forward-facing but Nuna recommends installation with seatbelt so you don’t have to remember to switch from one installation method to another when your child reaches a certain weight. See our complete Rava review here.
All in one seats can be used as a rear-facing seat, a forward facing seat, and as a belt-positioning high-back booster with the harness removed. Sometimes, you will be able to find an all in one that also converts to a backless booster with weight limits up to 120 pounds. Occasionally, you’ll see one with a booster mode that uses a harness, but they are pretty rare.
One in three children who die in auto accidents aren't protected by seat belts or car seats, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. Since the implementation of laws and national awareness campaigns such as Click It or Ticket, deaths have plummeted. In children younger than a year, for example, the proper use of car seats has reduced deaths by 71%.
Black fabric will hide stains better, but there are a wide variety of colors and patterns depending on the brand of car seat. Even the budget-friendly seats have a nice selection. The premium-priced seats usually have the best quality fabric and padding. They’re less likely to tear, pill and fade. We’ve found that breathability doesn’t depend much on price, however. 

All car seat models, convertible and otherwise, are subject to state laws regarding their safe use. Before car seat installation, parents and other caregivers must understand the regulations that apply to their state. What follows is by no means a comprehensive list, but it’s a great place to start. After all, nothing is more important than the health and safety of your precious cargo.


In many states, it is required by law for children below 1 year of age to be in a rear-facing car seat. Further, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents keep their toddlers in rear-facing seats until at least 2 years of age. It’s safest for children to remain in that seating position until the rear-facing weight limit of your convertible car seat is reached, which can be anywhere from 2 to 5 years of age depending on your child’s growth and the seat you choose.


If you have more than one child and have multiple safety seats in the car, you want to spread them out if possible (like in a van with multiple rows) or put them together for maximum protection. With a mix of booster and harnessed seats, place the booster seat in the middle so the older child is better protected. The harnessed seats will provide adequate side impact protection for the younger kids.
Our comments: Don’t confuse these specific SnugRide SnugLock models with any of the other current Graco SnugRide models available (there are multiple Click Connect and SnugLock versions with various specs and features). The SnugRide SnugLock 35 DLX & Elite models both come with the premium SnugLock DLX base that we prefer. Both the DLX & Elite models fit preemies and small newborns well. Both have a tall shell so they also fit older babies and smaller toddlers well. The DLX model is currently only available at Babies R Us and BuyBuyBaby for MSRP $199.99. The MSRP on the Elite SnugLock model is $219.99 but it can often be found online for less.  See our full review of the SnugRide SnugLock 35.
Note that this seat does NOT convert to a backless booster. Quality control can be hit or miss with this seat. As far as visual appeal goes, the seat is superb for the younger kids who love Disney and other superhero characters. Once your kids approach the upper limit for the booster seat however, they may be very disenchanted with the look and want something more “grown up”.
You may have heard that babies can ride forward-facing at 1 year old or 20 pounds from many well-meaning sources. That's the old standard, though. All children are safer if they remain in a rear-facing car seat beyond their first birthday. Thanks to higher rear-facing weight limits on car seats, nearly all toddlers can remain rear-facing to age 2 and beyond.
Why would you want to keep your child rear-facing? Crash data shows us that anybody is safer in a crash when riding rear-facing for the reasons outlined above. Even though your baby's neck may now be strong enough to withstand some types of forward-facing crash forces, he or she is still better protected in a rear-facing car seat because that seat still distributes the force over a greater body area and still gives better support to their young head and neck.
The mifold is for kids weighing from 40 to 100 pounds who are 40" to 57" tall. The product folds up into a neat, compact size—10" long, 4.5" wide and 2" tall—that’s easy to stash in a backpack or suitcase, and it is safety tested and meets or exceeds NHTSA standards. While it doesn’t have extra features like many other booster seats, the ​mifold still takes the seatbelt off the stomach and the neck and has a comfortable surface for kids to sit on.​
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